Breakout Sessions

1:45 - 3:00 p.m.3:15 - 4:30 p.m.

Breakout Sessions 1:45 – 3:00 p.m.

Please choose one session to attend.  See descriptions of sessions below the overview (coming soon)

Session 1 The Meanings of Faith and Spiritual Practice
Zvi Bellin
Session 2 Compassion Fatigue Understanding and Management: Creating Strong and Healthy California LPCCs
Carrie Beth Lin
Session 3 Are We Throwing People Away?
Heidi Paul
Session 4 The Art of Writing Mental Health Records (Part One)
Federico Grosso
Session 5 Career Opportunities at County Behavioral Health Programs
Brock Kolby
Session 6 Counseling Muslims: Understanding the Impact of 9/11 on the Wellness of Muslims in the U.S.
Irmak Basaran
Session 7 Modern Psychoanalytic Approaches to Counseling: Empowering Clients through New Co-Constructed Understandings
Jay Reid
Session 8 Closed Session: Educators’ Consortium (Part One)
Leah Brew and Steven Tierney

Session Descriptions

Session One:

The Meanings of Faith and Spiritual Practice

Zvi Bellin, John F. Kennedy University

In California clients are showing up with an increase in spiritual diversity. This workshop will introduce post-conventional faith and explore the faith journeys of clients from a meaning-making perspective. Attendees will learn how to unpack a client’s emerging spiritual path, enhancing their ability to form a healthy therapeutic alliance. Attendees will learn how to access the tool box of potentially beneficial (or limiting) mechanisms that extend from a client’s religious and spiritual life. Lastly, we will explore how counselor can weave their own faith-based beliefs into their work in a way that best supports their clients.

Attendees will:

  • Learn about the widening range of spiritual and religious practices that counselors may encounter out in the field, which includes an understanding of how faith and spirituality may change throughout a client’s life.
  • Learn about ongoing assessment tools to explore diverse and complex spiritual and religious paths with their clients throughout the course of treatment.
  • Have the opportunity to uncover their own personal biases about post-conventional spiritual and religious lives, as well as discuss how their own faith-based and spiritual beliefs can be integrated successfully into treatment without causing harm to their clients.

Zvi Bellin holds a Ph.D. in Pastoral Counseling and Counselor Education from Loyola University in Maryland. He is an Assistant Professor of Holistic Counseling at JFK University, and is a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. Dr. Bellin’s clinical and research interests include issues of spirituality and religion, life transitions, and meaning making for individuals, couples, and families. He is a Registered Yoga Teacher, and facilitates contemplative retreats in both universal and Jewish contexts.


Session Two:

Compassion Fatigue Understanding and Management: Creating Strong and Healthy California LPCCs

Carrie Beth Lin, Counseling and More

Compassion fatigue is a common and serious issue among mental health professionals. As a new profession in California, LPCCs have an opportunity to prioritize and value compassion fatigue understanding and management. Making compassion fatigue a central issue within the profession, at personal, organizational, and professional levels, will lead to a strong and healthy workforce of LPCCs. In this practical session, we will define compassion fatigue, learn to recognize it in ourselves and others, understand risk factors, and learn management methods that we can implement immediately. Participants will leave with an understanding of self-care, mindfulness, and somatic tools, as well as ideas for introducing compassion fatigue management into their workplaces and professional groups.

Attendees will:

  • Define compassion fatigue, name 7 symptoms, and use an assessment instrument.
  • Name 7 risk factors for and 3 potential consequences of compassion fatigue.
  • Identify 9 ways to manage compassion fatigue at a personal level, 7 at an organizational level, and 5 at a professional level.

Carrie Beth Lin, MA, LPCC is in private practice in Los Gatos. Her specialties include career counseling, mood disorders, and anxiety disorders. She has worked as a vocational rehabilitation counselor, behavior coach, college instructor, and behavioral health researcher. She has served diverse populations, including individuals with a wide range of disabilities, children and adolescents, and clients within the welfare and other social service systems. Carrie is an adjunct faculty member at Sofia University.


Session Three:

Are We Throwing People Away?

Heidi Paul, California State University, Los Angeles

The deinstitutionalization of people with mental illness was intended to liberate the mentally ill from the poor conditions and treatment in the mental health institutions of the 1950’s. The process of moving people from involuntary institutionalization to board and care facilities began after John F Kennedy, signed the 1963 Community Mental Health Act. As people moved from institutions to group housing, many found themselves in poor neighborhoods, unemployed, and unable to adequately follow-up on their care. Fifty years after the passage of the Community Mental Health Act, the quality of life for the mentally ill is deplorable. One-half of homeless people have severe psychiatric disorders and there are 10 times more people with mental illness in prison than state facilities.

Attendees will:

  • History of deinstitutionalization in the United States
  • Current status of people with mental health disability in the United States.
  • Legislation designed to improve the quality of life for people with mental health illness.

Heidi Paul, Ph.D. received her M.S. in Rehabilitation Counseling from California State University, Los Angeles and her Ph.D. in Rehabilitation Counseling & Special Education from the University of Arizona. She is a Certified Rehabilitation Counselor, a Certified Life Care Planner and a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor. She serves is a vocational consultant and is an associate professor of Rehabilitation Counseling and Rehabilitation Services at California State University, Los Angeles.


 Session Four:

The Art of Writing Mental Health Records (Part One)

Federico Grosso

Clinicians in California are legally required to maintain mental health records that meet the standard of care. this course addresses the records content that meets these standards. Utilizing this content structure and form can help clinicians avert malpractice actions and BBS administrative actions. This course will help clinicians understand their legal responsibility and maintain appropriate records based on the author’s forensic experience in malpractice actions.

Attendees will:

  • Learn the legal duty of keeping mental records in California.
  • Learn the nature of the content and record entry to maximize comprehension and effectiveness.
  • Learn how to use mental health records in a protective manner to minimize possible BBS administrative or malpractice legal actions.

Federico Grosso, DDS, PhD, MFT, BCFE, is a licensed marriage and family therapist in forensic private forensic practice in Santa Barbara, California. He is an author, academician, consultant, expert witness, and lecturer in the area of legal and ethical guidelines for marriage and family therapists, clinical social workers, licensed professional counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. He serves as a successful and effective expert witness in malpractice and BBS administrative actions in this field and provides consultation to attorneys on enhancing the strength of their legal actions involving clinicians.


Session Five:

Career Opportunities at County Behavioral Health Programs

Brock Kolby, Calaveras County Health & Human Services Agency

This presentation will include a discussion of opportunities for licensed professional clinical counselors at county behavioral health programs. County behavioral health programs have a wide range of opportunities for clinical internships and also for people working in case management, crisis work, or other related mental health fields. This will include a discussion of financial incentives for student loan repayment for working in underserved areas. Last, there will be a discussion of the qualities, education, and experience that hiring supervisors look for in candidates for clinical positions.

Attendees will:

  • Identify and name the different career possibilities in mental health services at county behavioral health organizations.
  • Identify and name the financial incentives to work at county behavioral health organizations in underserved areas.
  • Name the type of strengths, educational experiences, and internship or work experiences that hiring supervisors look for in candidates for clinical positions as a licensed professional clinical counselor..

Dr. Brock Kolby is a licensed professional clinical counselor with a doctorate in Education who has worked in the field of mental health for 20 years. He has recently served as the Interim Director of Calaveras County Behavioral Health Services, and currently, he is a supervisor for the Adult and Older Adult Systems of Care.


 Session Six:

Counseling Muslims: Understanding the Impact of 9/11 on the Wellness of Muslims in the U.S.

Irmak Basaran, California School of Professional Psychology

The 9/11 terrorist attacks had an impact on all Americans, but it had specific consequences for Muslims in the United States. Hatred against Muslims and Islamophobic incidents have increased since 9/11 and had a detrimental impact on Muslims’ psychological well-being. In fact, counselors have several responsibilities for effective work with Muslims: acknowledge the discrimination Muslims face, be educated on diversity issues (e.g. heterogeneity among Muslims), practice cultural competency, utilize religion in therapy and collaborate with imams, if needed, and advocate for social justice. This roundtable session aims to define and discuss the post–9/11 era in order to deepen counselors’ and trainees’ understanding of the issues of Muslims and provide guidance for professional practices with Muslim clients.

Attendees will:

  • Develop an understanding of their own values, biases and assumptions about Muslims and the ways in which they can become an obstacle in a counseling session.
  • Acquire knowledge.
  • Be able to demonstrate the use of advocacy and religion as therapeutic interventions.

Irmak Basaran received her M.A. Degree in Clinical Counseling with an emphasis on social justice advocacy from the California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP). In school, Irmak gave several presentations on the issues of Muslims in relation to counseling. With her colleagues, she cooperated with the Council on American-Islamic Relations, and prepared a needs assessment and literature review on the topic. Recently, she presented on “Muslims in the workplace” as a guest speaker at CSPP.


 Session Seven:

Modern Psychoanalytic Approaches to Counseling: Empowering Clients through New Co-Constructed Understandings

Jay Reid, Private Practice

This presentation will introduce the psychoanalytic perspectives of Self Psychology and Intersubjectivity as useful lenses for conceptualizing and treating clients with longstanding global feelings of unhappiness. These theories offer developmental frameworks for understanding such clients’ problems. After explaining these frameworks, the therapeutic importance of fully understanding and co-articulating the client’s perspective will be highlighted. Last, case material will be discussed that illustrates these theoretical tenets and demonstrates how an empathic and collaborative can effect lasting therapeutic change over time.

Attendees will:

  • Define the model of self development proposed by Self Psychology.
  • Be able to articulate how an Intersubjective organizing principle of experience is developed and how it might be more fully articulated during therapy.
  • Articulate why empathy is the critical ingredient to cure from the perspective of both theories.

Jay Reid is a pre-licensed therapist (PCCI) with a private practice in San Francisco. He is an active member in the San Francisco psychoanalytic community – with particular interest in Self Psychology and Intersubjective approaches to treatment. As a graduate student in clinical psychology, he researched and published on the study of client-therapist processes that resulted in positive psychotherapeutic change. He hopes to help shape the voice of intersubjective psychoanalytic approaches within the CALPCC community..


 Session Eight:

Educators’ Consortium

Leah Brew, California State Fullerton, and Steven Tierney. representative for BBS

This session is only open to Counselor Educators.

Breakout Sessions 3:15 – 4:30 p.m.

Please choose one session to attend.  See descriptions of sessions below the overview

Session 1 Raising the Bar: Critical New Concepts in the 2014 ACA Ethics Code (continued from morning Plenary Session)
David Kaplan
Session 2 Microaggressions and Challenges to Self-care in Professional Clinical Counseling
E. Janie Pinterits and Sheila Addison
Session 3 Refugee women survivors of transnational civil unrest
Kristen Curry
Session 4 The Art of Writing Mental Health Records (Part Two)
Federico Grosso
Session 5 Drugs and Creativity: A Support Group for Active Drug Users
Barton Shulman and Claudia Figallo
Session 6 Counseling Bicultural Clients
Cara Maffini
Session 7
Roundtable Discussions

 

Roundtable 1: Speed Diversity Dialogue®; An Innovative Training to Foster Multicultural Competence in the New Millennium
Elisa Velasquez-Andrade and Angelina Gutierrez

 

Roundtable 2: Contemplative Existential Awareness in Harm Reduction Psychotherapy
Jeremy Rhoades

 

Roundtable 3: Clinical Implications of Working with Gifted and Highly Sensitive Clients
Grace Malonai

 

Roundtable 4: Mindful ExistenC
Liza Lichtinger

 

Roundtable 5: Male Caregivers of Female Breast Cancer Patients: Understanding the Psychosocial Impacts of Informal Caregiving
Sarah Dihmes and Irmak Basaran

 

Roundtable 6: Designing a Statewide LPCC-tracked Counselor Trainee Field Practice Experience: Lessons from the Pilot Year
Jayne Smith, Brenda Medina Ayala, and Kiesha Wallace
Session 8:
Closed Session: Counselor Educators Consortium (Part II)
Leah Brew, California State University, Fullerton
Steven Tierney, Board of Behavioral Sciences

Session Descriptions

Session One:

Raising the Bar: Critical New Concepts in the 2014 ACA Ethics Code (continued from morning Plenary Session)

David Kaplan, American Counseling Association

The recent revision of the American Counseling Association Code of Ethics substantially raises the bar for the ethical practice of professional counselors. This presentation will highlight new ethical imperatives in such areas as professional values, social media, the imposition of counselor personal values, defining the moment ethical responsibilities begin, and fee splitting.

Attendees will:

  • Be informed about the new 2014 ACA Code of Ethics.
  • Learn important changes in the new ethics code.
  • Learn how to protect themselves against malpractice lawsuits by keeping current with the ACA Code of Ethics.

David Kaplan, PhD, NCC is a Past President of the American Counseling Association and its current Chief Professional Officer. David’s experience includes eighteen years of practice in private practice and college counseling settings as well as twenty-five years of experience as a counselor educator. Dr. Kaplan’s publications include one book, eight book chapters and thirty-eight journal articles and he has conducted over 260 professional presentations. David is an ACA Fellow.


 

Session Two:

Microaggressions and Challenges to Self-care in Professional Clinical Counseling

Janie Pinterits and Sheila Addison, California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University

Microaggressions negatively impact self-care. Microaggressions are brief and commonplace verbal, behavioral indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, which communicate hostile or negative slights and insults towards people of a minority status; those who perpetrate microaggressions are often unaware that they have done anything to harm another person (Nadal, 2008). This presentation provides an overview of microaggressions and explores self-care needs in counseling, training and supervision. The presenters will propose practical self-care tools. Participants will identify progressive, regressive and parallel supervision interactions (Helms & Cook, 1999) and how they relate to self-care. Participants will role play use of broaching to directly address diversity issues (Day-Vines et al., 2013) to facilitate conversations of microaggressions and encourage healthier and more socially just communication.

Attendees will:

  • Describe microaggressions and their relationship to multicultural competence development.
  • Discuss ways in which microaggressions impact self-care and stress management.
  • Examine and discuss one’s own social locations and one’s intersections vis a vis those of a client and/or a supervisee using broaching techniques.

Janie Pinterits, Ph.D., Associate Professor and System-wide Director of the Clinical Counseling program at California School of Professional Psychology. Her research includes the assessment of White privilege attitudes, systems of privilege and oppression, social justice advocacy competence, and training. Her publications have appeared in The Journal of Counseling Psychology, Counselor Education and Supervision, PsycCRITIQUES, and The Oxford Handbook of Social Class in Counseling. She earned APA’s Society Of Counseling Psychology Section On Ethnic And Racial Diversity 2013 Outstanding Service To Diverse/Underserved Communities award.

Dr. Sheila Addison earned a PhD in Marriage and Family Therapy and is an AAMFT Clinical Member and Approved Supervisor. She is an LMFT working as a Visiting Assistant Professor in a Professional Counseling MA program. She has taught in programs accredited by AAMFT, CACREP, and APA, with curricular and clinical focus on social justice principles. She has presented highly rated seminars at AAMFT and other conferences, and published articles on a variety of topics related to LGBT issues in clinical work, supervision, and research.


 

Session Three:

Refugee women survivors of transnational civil unrest

Kristen Curry, UnseenXS

In recent years the United States government has provided amnesty to refugee immigrants displaced by civil war. Many cities have become home to a large population of displaced refugees, some as large as 15,000 people at a time. A large portion of these populations are women survivors of complex trauma. Treating complex trauma in displaced refugee women survivors of civil war living in the United States requires cultural competence, compassion, and the willingness for the therapist to think “outside the box”. This roundtable discussion is an open dialogue among counseling colleagues and students that seek to bridge the gap between Americanized versions of traditional trauma treatment and the individual needs of recent refugee trauma survivors.

Attendees will:

  • Increase awareness of the transnational implications of civil unrest regarding women refugees mental health.
  • Build cultural competence when adapting existing trauma treatment models to fit the needs of the client.
  • Understand the social justice advocacy needs for refugee women survivors of civil unrest living in the United States..

Kristen Curry holds a M.A. in clinical counseling from the California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP) and is the CEO of a 501(c)3 nonprofit community organization. Currently working in community mental health settings as a registered Professional Clinical Counseling Intern (PCCI), she serves demographically diverse populations inclusive of refugee women of civil war. Kristen has provided individual trauma focused therapy to women of Hmong, Bosniak, and Unkrainian identities, inclusive of treatment of comorbid mental health diagnoses


Session Four:

The Art of Writing Mental Health Records (Part Two)

Federico Grosso

Clinicians in California are legally required to maintain mental health records that meet the standard of care. this course addresses the records content that meets these standards. Utilizing this content structure and form can help clinicians avert malpractice actions and BBS administrative actions. This course will help clinicians understand their legal responsibility and maintain appropriate records based on the author’s forensic experience in malpractice actions.

Attendees will:

  • Learn the legal duty of keeping mental records in California.
  • Learn the nature of the content and record entry to maximize comprehension and effectiveness.
  • Learn how to use mental health records in a protective manner to minimize possible BBS administrative or malpractice legal actions.

Federico Grosso, DDS, PhD, MFT, BCFE, is a licensed marriage and family therapist in forensic private forensic practice in Santa Barbara, California. He is an author, academician, consultant, expert witness, and lecturer in the area of legal and ethical guidelines for marriage and family therapists, clinical social workers, licensed professional counselors, and drug and alcohol counselors. He serves as a successful and effective expert witness in malpractice and BBS administrative actions in this field and provides consultation to attorneys on enhancing the strength of their legal actions involving clinicians.


 

Session Five:

Drugs and Creativity: A Support Group for Active Drug Users

Barton Shulman and Claudia Figallo, UCSF Alliance Health Project / Haight Ashbury Psychological Services

Creative Arts can be used in a pure harm-reduction group setting, or as an adjunct to traditional therapies or 12-step groups. The Creative Arts Groups and workshops conducted at the UCSF Alliance Health Project (AHP) with active substance users have proven to be effective at increasing a sense of community among individual members, exploring sometimes difficult issues of sexuality, relationships, triggers, emotions, and goals. The use of non-verbal media in combination with speech and movement opens up new means of expression and exploration for these often underserved clients.

Attendees will:

  • Learn the history of the Creative Arts Group, including the complex issues which led to its creation.
  • Learn some of the specific tools and techniques utilized within the Creative Arts Group. This will include didactic and experiential elements.
  • Learn the potential beneficial results of a Creative Arts Group or course of therapy.

Barton Shulman recently completed his MA in Clinical Counseling at CSPP, after a 30-year career in technology. He has been a support group facilitator at UCSF AIDS Health Project (now Alliance Health Project, “AHP”) for 19 years, and has supervised group facilitators for Bay Area Young Positives. Bart has co-facilitated AHP’s Creative Arts Groups for active drug users with Claudia Figallo, MPH. He is currently an intern at Haight Ashbury Psychological Services and at AHP.

Claudia Figallo, MPH has been advocating and supporting drug user health through harm reduction for over 10 years. She assists drug users to explore their using practices and make wiser choices about their health. Claudia works as a substance abuse counselor and group facilitator at the UCSF-Alliance Health Project, trains community members to lead peer led groups and is a Board Member for the Harm Reduction Therapy Center in San Francisco. She has a post-graduate diploma in Drama and Movement Therapy.


 

Session Six:

Counseling Bicultural Clients

Cara Maffini, San Jose State University

With more than half of Californians identifying a racial or ethnic minority (Census, 2013), a large portion of clients in California navigate at least two differing cultures. To address the needs of these bicultural clients, I present a framework to facilitate client conceptualization integrating emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and identity processes while considering the activating effects of context, cultural cues, and language. I will also present two new measures that examine positive and negative feelings individuals experience toward the cultures with which they identify – Feelings About Culture Scale – Ethnic Culture (FACS-EC) and Feelings About Culture Scale – Mainstream American Culture (FACS-MAC). The balance of this presentation will address how clinicians can use the framework and measures to inform clinical interventions.

Attendees will:

  • Develop greater awareness of the psychological experiences of bicultural individuals including the interconnections among their emotions, cognitions, behaviors, and identity for each culture and how these are activated through contextual, linguistic, and cultural cues.
  • Develop techniques related to client conceptualization to facilitate culturally responsive interventions with bicultural clients.
  • Develop techniques related to client conceptualization to facilitate culturally responsive interventions with bicultural clients.

Cara Maffini is an Assistant Professor at San Jose State University. She is originally from San Jose and completed her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology at Indiana University Bloomington. Her research interests include intersections of race, culture, and mental health focusing on cultural risk and protective factors associated with violence and victimization experienced by ethnic minority youth. Clinically, she identifies as a generalist and is interested in culturally responsive interventions and identity exploration.


 

Session Seven: Round Table Discussions – 6 options

Speed Diversity Dialogue®; An Innovative Training to Foster Multicultural Competence in the New Millennium

Elisa Velasquez-Andrade and Angelina Gutierrez, Sonoma State University

Counseling professionals are expected to continually enhance their multicultural competence, including awareness, knowledge and skills about the self and others to work effectively with diverse populations today (ACA, 2014; APA Multicultural Guidelines, 2002). In this workshop, we will implement a multicultural training technique called Speed Diversity Dialogue® (SDD). Participants will engage in consecutive 3-minute dialogue sessions around the Big 8 of Diversity (culture, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, religion, disability, & age) using ten prompts to facilitate face-to-face interaction. Participants will leave with tools to implement within their own counseling practice and educational environments. Our research findings suggest that SDD is a high impact, low cost model that can be used as a first step to enhance multicultural competence.

Attendees will:

  • Recognize not only the psychological and social implications of stereotypical, prejudicial, and discriminatory behaviors, but also how clinicians and clients may be engaging in these behaviors unconsciously and unintentionally.
  • Identify common ground amongst participants, obtain a deeper understanding of self and others’ social group membership, increase empathy, connectedness, and confidence in relating to the increasingly diverse population of California.
  • Apply the knowledge and awareness gained from Speed Diversity Dialogue, an innovative multicultural training, to participants’ counseling practice in order to enhance their multicultural competence.

Elisa Velasquez-Andrade, a native of Mexico, is a full professor and chair of the department of psychology at Sonoma State University (SSU). She holds a B.S. in psychology and a M.A in child development (National University of Mexico). She obtained a M.A and a Ph. D. from The University of Texas at Austin in educational psychology. Currently, she is studying the effects of Speed Diversity Dialogue®, a multicultural training developed by her research team.

Angelina Gutierrez is a Masters of Science student in the Mental Health Counseling (Forensic Counseling) program at Walden University. She holds a B.A. in psychology from Sonoma State University where she worked under Dr. Elisa Velásquez-Andrade conducting empirical research and diversity training. Upon completing her master’s degree, she plans to become a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor serving high-risk youth within the juvenile justice system in the state of California.

Contemplative Existential Awareness in Harm Reduction Psychotherapy

Jeremy Rhoades, Curious Journey

Harm Reduction Therapy (as developed by the Harm Reduction Therapy Center) is a revolutionary client-therapist collaboration that combines substance abuse treatment with psychotherapy, so clients can address both their substance use and the issues that are behind it. By increasing our understanding as clinicians of the complex relationship between trauma and substance misuse, we will increase our capacity for empathy, our ability to hold a nonjudgmental space, and our attunement to appropriate self-care. By bringing our attention to the intersubjective client-therapist field, through study and practice of mindfulness and meditation techniques, we can increase awareness of the relationship as a tool for change.

Attendees will:

  • Articulate at least one personal bias re: drug use and misuse, and name three principles of harm reduction psychotherapy.
  • Design an individualized plan for trauma stewardship.
  • Summarize how mindfulness-based psychotherapy differs from goal-oriented psychotherapy, and why this is important in treating clients with adverse or traumatic experiences in their personal histories.

Jeremy Rhoades is a Marriage and Family Therapist and Professional Clinical Counselor, with a background in international studies and ecopsychology. He enjoys hiking, camping, surfing, creative writing, and keeping up with friends. He strongly believes our fast-paced society could use a dose of deep breathing!

Clinical Implications of Working with Gifted and Highly Sensitive Clients

Grace Malonai, TheraThrive | Gifted Identity

The innate behaviors and characteristics of gifted and highly sensitive clients can be perplexing. Misunderstanding them can lead to misdiagnosis and treatment errors. The ability to process rapidly may look like inattentiveness or impulsiveness; high intellectual energy may mimic hyperactivity; a strong need for fairness and justice may seem like rigidity; creativity may appear like non-conformance; or high self-standards may look like intolerance. Gifted clients share traits that significantly impact their internal experience, as well as how they process and react to the world around them. In order to help this population, it is important that therapists both recognize giftedness and tailor their therapeutic practices so that their clients can reach their full potential and lead happy fulfilling lives.

Attendees will:

  • Gain insight and understanding about what giftedness is; Recognize and differentiate gifted traits in clients, students, or others.
  • Learn counseling tools specifically designed for working with the gifted population.
  • Gain insight and understand for forming an effective therapeutic alliance with gifted and/or highly sensitive adults, children and teens, which is important because many gifted individuals quit therapy when they do not feel understood or if there is an ineffective therapeutic alliance.

Grace Malonai, Ph.D., LPCC, a psychotherapist since 1998, specializes in issues of giftedness and high sensitivity. She has been an instructor for the Graduate Counseling Program at St. Mary’s College of California since 2003. In addition to gifted development, she has received intensive training in family systems, human development, trauma and recovery, Relational-Cultural work, Depth Oriented Brief Therapy, and Narrative Therapy. Grace’s passion in gifted development blossomed when she began homeschooling her exceptional child.

Mindful ExistenC

Liza Lichtinger, MindfulExistenC

Mindfulness in Clinical Practice integrates into traditional Psychotherapy a non invasive aid and tool for clients and patients. This session is an introduction on the various methods in which mindfulness may be explained, understood, and led by teachings for purposes of daily application in life. Attention and awareness in therapy allows for a deeper and more safe and secure development of the client-therapist relationship. Mindfulness speaks of a certain way that one may direct their attention, becoming more sensitive of how it may be developed with practice, then ultimately lived.

Attendees will:

  • Explanation of Mindfulness, brief Historical Account, past research aspects and present applications. Explanation of integration into psychotherapy, and interactions between therapist and client.
  • Techniques for developing mindfulness introduced (Formal and informal practices); Preparation (Mindful Breathing).
  • Practice, brief, of most recent technique introduced.

Liza Lichtinger gained her Masters degree in Counseling Psychology from Argosy University in 2009 during which her graduate research included techniques applied towards sustaining levels of conscious and corporeal sustained awareness. Liza guides clients towards steady healing having worked with individuals, couples, families, recovery populations, and led various groups and retreats as a psychotherapist/yoga teacher/and Mindfulness Meditation instructor worldwide. Liza holds her home offices in the Financial District of San Francisco, CA.

Male Caregivers of Female Breast Cancer Patients: Understanding the Psychosocial Impacts of Informal Caregiving

Sarah Dihmes and Irmak Basaran, John Hopkins University

This study found significant associations between relationship satisfaction and a caregiver’s adjustment to a spouse’s breast cancer diagnosis. Sixty male caregivers of female breast cancer patients were surveyed about breast cancer illness factors, relationship satisfaction, depression, and sexual role strain. The results showed that the stage of cancer and type of treatment were related to the level of relationship satisfaction, depression, and sexual role strain, which suggests that men are at risk for caregiver strain and psychosocial distress when providing informal care to a loved one. The methods and results will be explained in the poster. We will offer examples of interventions in hospitals and counseling offices.

Attendees will:

  • Be able to identify the male caregiving burden: Research has found that spouses caring for a partner with cancer can undergo high levels of stress, depressive symptoms, marital dissatisfaction, and unmet needs.
  • Learn more about counseling men for depression as caregivers of female breast cancer patients: Gender specific interventions are needed to identify and work on specific stressors, vulnerabilities, and coping skills.
  • Be able to illustrate the relationship between caregiver depression, cancer stages and types, and role strain: The study seeks to generate interest for other researchers and counselors, who may want to conduct further research on the relationship between role strain and prototypical and masculine depression, cancer type and adjustment to illness, and cancer stages and adjustment to illness.

Sarah Dihmes received her Clinical Psychology Ph.D., with an emphasis in Health Psychology, in San Diego, CA. Her doctoral research focused on the application of the stress process in male caregivers of breast cancer patients, based at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She completed her fellowship in the Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology and the Chemotherapy and Infusion Clinic in California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, CA, and has several publications in medical journals.

Irmak Basaran holds an M.A. Degree in Clinical Counseling from the California School of Professional Psychology. She is currently a mental health care provider in Richmond, CA and the research project coordinator for the male caregivers of breast cancer patients project based out of Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD under the chief investigator, Sarah Dihmes, PhD. Irmak coordinates the publication of three manuscripts to peer-reviewed medical and psychological journals.

Designing a Statewide LPCC-tracked Counselor Trainee Field Practice Experience: Lessons from the Pilot Year

Jayne E. Smith, Brenda Medina Ayala, and Kiesha Wallace, John Muir Charter Schools

Graduate coursework culminates in field practice intended to bring theory and practice together, continue to clarify counselor professional identity and prepare trainees for a professional career in counseling. Regulations and professional training standards (i.e., 2009 CACREP standards) outline requirements for clinical supervision and counseling activities during field practice. This presentation focuses on a field practice experience in its pilot year for LPCC-tracked counselor trainees. John Muir Charter Schools, a statewide high school provides 16 to 25 year-old former high school dropouts opportunities to earn diplomas, learn job and life skills, and, now, access free mental health counseling. Presenters will share about trainee orientation, training, supervision and counseling theory, and the program logic model including advocacy and multicultural competency outcomes.

Attendees will:

  • Learn strategies to ensure optimal counselor trainee orientation and training at the initial field practice phase.
  • Gain knowledge about an approach to supervision that integrates the developmental theory (Skovholt & Ronnestad, 1992), the discrimination model (Bernard, 1979) and the liberation model (Steele, 2008) to foster professional clinical counselor identity, knowledge and skills.
  • Understand the program logic model that addresses formative and summative evaluation of JMCS Counseling Services, including field practice, in its pilot year to inform expansion of JMCS Counseling Services to other locations across California.

Dr. Jayne E. Smith, director of counseling services for John Muir Charter Schools, oversees mental health counseling services for re-engaged 16 to 25 year-old high school students across California.  Counseling services are provided by LPCC-tracked counselor trainees enrolled in graduate counseling programs under her clinical supervision.  Dr. Smith earned a PhD in counselor education and supervision and is one of the first 500 LPCCs in California.  She is published and maintains a research agenda.

Brenda Medina Ayala is a second year graduate student at University of Redlands studying clinical mental health. She is a counselor trainee at John Muir Charter School in Riverside, CA. Ms. Medina Ayala is an aspiring student researcher and LPCC counselor with the ultimate goal of continuing to work with and serve under-researched and under-represented communities.

Kiesha Wallace is a graduate student at University of Redlands pursuing a clinical mental health degree. Upon completion in 2015, Mrs. Wallace will register as a professional clinical counselor intern with the California BBS to become an LPCC. She currently serves as a counselor trainee at John Muir Charter School for over 70 students aged 16 to 25. In her spare time, Mrs. Wallace enjoys spending time with her family.


 

Session Eight:

Educators’ Consortium

Leah Brew, California State Fullerton, and Steven Tierney. representative for BBS

This session is only open to Counselor Educators.